Our champions

Oksana Baiul (born November 16, 1977) is a Ukrainian former competitive figure skater. She is the 1993 World champion and the 1994 Olympic champion in ladies’ singles.

Baiul is the first skater to win gold at the Winter Olympics representing Ukraine. She is also the first Olympic champion of independent Ukraine in any sport.

Personal life

Baiul was born on November 16, 1977 in Dnipropetrovsk, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet Union, an industrial city famous for manufacturing Soviet missiles. Her parents divorced when she was two years old. One day when she was two, her father disappeared. No one is certain whether Sergei Baiul deserted his family or was pressured to leave town when he and his wife divorced. She was raised by her mother, Marina—a French teacher—and her maternal grandparents.

Baiul first stepped onto the ice at the age of four thanks to her grandfather, who bought her a pair of skates and urged her to exercise in order to lose weight. He also believed that she could be a future prima ballerina and that skating was a fine training ground for dance. Baiul pursued ballet, but ultimately chose ice skating. As she trained, her mother shouldered Baiul’s training expenses, paying for lessons, costumes, and equipment. By the age of five, Baiul studied with Stanislav Korytek, one of the finest Ukrainian coaches.

Her grandfather died in 1987, her grandmother in 1988, and in 1991 her mother, who had previously been very healthy, died suddenly of ovarian cancer. Her father, Sergei, appeared at her mother’s funeral but Oksana wanted nothing to do with him. By the time of the death of her mother, her grandparents had also died, leaving Baiul orphaned. Korytek housed Baiul briefly, but within weeks of Bauil’s mother’s death, he left, too. He left while Baiul performed in a skating competition, fleeing to Canada for a promising job at the Toronto Skating, Curling, and Cricket Club.

Before Korytek left Oksana, he called Galina Zmievskaya, who had coached 1992 Olympic gold medalist Victor Petrenko—also soon to be Galina’s son-in-law—and implored her to take in the young skater. Zmievskaya welcomed Baiul into her circle of elite skaters, and provided her shelter in her family’s cramped, grim, three-room apartment in Odessa. Under Zmievskaya’s training, Baiul quickly rose to greatness.

After moving to Odessa in mid-1992, she lived mainly in a dormitory with her expenses covered by the state. In 1993, she lived a month with coach Galina Zmievskaya between the European and World Championships. After the 1994 Winter Olympics, Baiul moved to Simsbury, Connecticut, which is the location of the International Skating Center of Connecticut. In the late 1990s, she lived in Richmond, Virginia for several years before moving to Cliffside Park, New Jersey. After residing for 14 years in Cliffside Park, Baiul moved to Pennsylvania in March 2012, settling in Upper Makefield Township, Bucks County.

In January 1997, Baiul was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol after crashing her car into a tree in Bloomfield, Connecticut. The charges were dropped after she met the terms of probation and completed an alcohol education program. Her drinking continued, however, and in May 1997 she entered an alcohol rehabilitation program for two and a half months. In a 2004 interview, Baiul said she had been sober for six years, saying “This is more important than Olympic gold.”

Baiul was raised as a Russian Orthodox Christian. As a child, she heard rumors that her grandmother was Jewish. In 2003, she phoned her old rink in Dnipropetrovsk to ask for assistance in locating her father—assuming it was a joke, they hung up twice but eventually Baiul managed to convince them of her identity and the rink manager helped her reunite with her father in September 2003. Her father confirmed that the rumor was true—her Romanian maternal grandmother was Jewish. Baiul considers herself Jewish due to matrilineality in Judaism. In 2005, Baiul said, “Being Jewish, that feels good. It feels natural, like a second skin”. She is of Russian descent through her maternal grandfather. Her father died in 2006.

Career

As a child, Baiul was interested in ballet but was not considered thin enough so her grandmother took her to skating lessons, saying it was ballet on skates. Her grandfather was also supportive of her skating which she began at age three in Dnipropetrovsk. She was coached by Stanislav Koritek until he was offered a coaching job in Toronto, Canada in March 1992 – he accepted due to problems in Ukraine after the collapse of the Soviet Union. In August 1992, his father, Alfred – the vice-president of the Ukrainian skating federation – called Galina Zmievskaya, working in Odessa, to take on Baiul as a student. Her other coach in Odessa was Valentin Nikolayev. She represented FSC “Ukraine” (Odessa, Dnipropetrovsk).

Baiul took the silver medal at the 1993 European Championships in Helsinki, finishing second to Surya Bonaly of France. Prior to the 1993 World Championships in Prague, Baiul crashed into the boards and displaced disks in her back and neck. At the event, she stopped practising and consulted a Czech doctor. Baiul competed in skates with crooked blades because it was too late to try a new pair. Ranked second in the short program and first in the free skate, she finished ahead of Bonaly and became world champion at age 15.

In 1994, Baiul repeated as the silver medalist at the European Championships in Copenhagen, again finishing second to Bonaly. At the 1994 Winter Olympics, Baiul was second to Nancy Kerrigan in the short program of Ladies’ singles. During a practise session before the long program, Baiul collided with Germany’s Tanja Szewczenko, sustaining a wrenched lower back and a small cut on her right shin from her left skate blade that required three stitches. She received two Olympic-approved pain-killing injections of anesthetics in her lower back and shoulder, which enabled her to compete in the free skate. Baiul won the Olympic gold medal ahead of Kerrigan and Chen Lu. Immediately after completing the long program, Baiul fell into hysteric tears in front of TV cameras. She was announced as the winner after Surya Bonaly and Katarina Witt completed their respective programs. In addition to her Olympic title, she was also named Merited Master of Sports in 1994.

Despite their status as Olympic champions, Baiul and Petrenko faced the same difficulties back home in Odessa as their fellow Ukrainians, living in a financially strapped country where even meat was a luxury and utility outages were a common occurrence. Conditions at their rink in Odessa had deteriorated severely due to the lack of financial support from the government for figure skating since the breakup of the Soviet Union. They had no working ice resurfacer, so coaches and skaters often had to resurface the ice by hand. The conditions influenced her decision to turn professional after the 1994 Winter Olympics, even though she was only 16 years old at the time. Zmievskaya negotiated a very profitable contract for her to tour the United States following the Olympics, an opportunity Baiul could only take advantage of as a professional. In May 1994, as a 16-year-old, Baiul signed an agreement with the talent agency William Morris Endeavor.

Baiul later claimed it was this tour where her later drinking problems took roots, saying: “Except myself, nearly all the figure skaters on the bus were grown-ups, and it was full of alcohol. Most of the skaters were Russians and Americans, and they all drank. That’s when I tried it. I was very young, with no-one to teach me the right. I thought it was the norm, cause as a teenager you don’t want to break away from the majority”.

Following the Olympics, Baiul was plagued by physical ailments that affected her skating ability. She required arthroscopic knee surgery in the summer of 1994, after which she was advised by her doctor not to return to the ice for two months. Due to the million-dollar touring contract, Baiul ignored the doctor’s recommendations and resumed skating in two weeks and returned to performing in six. This move, along with changes in her body, drastically hindered her jumping ability.

Year Event[5] Notes
1983-91 Trained with Stanislav Korytek
1991 Lived and trained in Odessa, Ukraine with Galina Zmievskaya Shortly after her mother’s death
1991 12th place, Soviet Championship
1993 Runner-up, European Championship
1993 Women’s figure skating gold medalist, World Championship in Prague
1994 Gold medalist, Olympics
1994 Performed in U.S. Outdoor Skating Challenge For the CBS television network
1994 A Promise Kept, a television movie based on Baiul’s life For the CBS television network
1994 Had knee surgery September
1994 Toured with the Tom Collins World Champions Tour
1994 Featured on the Barbara Walters Special One of the Ten Most Fascinating Personalities of 1994

Life after retirement from competition

In 1994, Baiul moved to the United States after she and Petrenko were invited to train at Simsbury, Connecticut’s newly built International Skating Center, with Zmievskaya asking to lead the coaching staff. In May 1997, Baiul was dropped from the Champions on Ice tour due to concerns about her drinking. She decided to part ways with Zmievskaya the same year. Baiul later completed a rehab program and in August 1998 she began training under Natalia Linichuk at the University of Delaware’s skating center. Baiul has continued to skate professionally from time to time, including an engagement with the touring show “Broadway on Ice.”

In December 2006, Baiul skated at the Red Square ice rink in Moscow alongside champions from Russia, China, France and other countries. In February 2007, she collaborated with renowned ballet dancer Saule Rachmedova to bring together Ice Theatre of New York and couture fashion for the debut of innovative fashion designer Levi Okunov’s “Winter Collection.” The following month, Baiul appeared on MTV’s Total Request Live. She was there to promote the new ice skating film Blades of Glory (2007), starring Will Ferrell. She was name-checked in the film itself when the character Charles “Chazz” Michael Michaels, played by Will Ferrell, talks through his tattoos with Jon Heder’s character. Michaels describes Baiul as his ‘blonde Ukrainian she-devil’.

Baiul had a role in the skating stage musical, Cold as Ice. The story surrounds six skaters from Canada, Russia, and the United States preparing for their national championships and the Olympics while dealing with demanding coaches, stage mothers, stage coaches, and other trials. The story itself was conceived and written by former skater Frank D’Agostino. A full stage version of Cold As Ice was produced and presented by the Gateway Playhouse in May 2007.

On March 8, 2009, and again on March 14, 2010, Baiul made guest appearances at the Kate Wollman Skating Rink at Prospect Park in Brooklyn, New York, as part of the skating center’s annual show. She also took part in meet-and-greet sessions with skating students after each performance.

On Saturday, March 27, 2010, Baiul skated at the One Step Closer HIV AIDS figure skating exhibition. Directed and produced by Tim David, the benefit was for the AIDS Resource Foundation for Children. She performed her signature Swan Lake program and was part of the meet-and-greet after the show.

Baiul is mentioned in the Family Guy episode, “Wasted Talent” (season 2, episode 20), during brewmaster Pawtucket Pat’s song about his brewery as a reference to her DUI.

Baiul has her own line of clothing and jewelry. In November 2005, Baiul appeared on the Bravo television program Celebrity Poker Showdown. She was also part of the celebrity panel of judges (along with Steve Garvey and Jonny Moseley) on the ABC show Master of Champions, which aired briefly in 2006.

Baiul supports the Tikva Children’s Home Charity, which works to aid the Jewish children of Odessa, Ukraine. In addition, Baiul supports and is a member of the International Museum of Women, a cultural and educational institution with the mission to celebrate the lives of women around the world. Baiul also funded a program to donate sled dogs to underprivileged Inuit children.

In November 2011, her manager and future husband, Carlo Farina, discovered accounting and collection discrepancies at William Morris Endeavor. After collecting $9.5 million from the company, Baiul filed a lawsuit in November 2012 in Los Angeles for an additional $1 million in compensatory damages and more in punitive damages. She sued NBCUniversal in February 2013 for their alleged illicit promotional use of her likeness. Having withdrawn the November case, she filed a broader lawsuit in New York in October 2013.

In January 2015, she publicly accused her former coach Galina Zmievskaya, Viktor Petrenko and their manager Joseph Lemire of fraud, claiming they ‘have been stealing money’ from her for more than a decade. She also accused Lemire of fraudulent attempts to represent her in multiple court proceedings in Ukraine against the state, concerning various assets.

As of January 2015, Baiul is married to her manager Carlo Farina and prefers to title herself as ‘Oksana Baiul-Farina’. They reside in Las Vegas.

Results

International
Event 1989–90 1990–91 1991–92 1992–93 1993–94
Winter Olympics 1st
World Champ. 1st
European Champ. 2nd 2nd
Skate America 1st
Nations Cup 4th 2nd
National
Ukrainian Champ. 1st 1st
Soviet Champ. 12th 10th

Biography

Elena Lyashenko (9 August 1976, Kyiv) – Ukrainian figure skater (figure skating). The multiple champion of Ukraine, winner of the European Championships and the Grand Prix stages. The master of sports of international class.

Experts and fans determine the riding style of Elena Lyashenko as an example “the most pronounced feminine skating.”

Born August 9, 1976 in the city. Kiev. Figure skating began with an 1980. Higher education. Married.

Height – 160 cm, weight – 47.5 kg. Coach – Marina Amirhanova.

After the XX Winter Olympics (Turin, 2006) completed a career. Since then a coach.

Achievement

1994

Ukraine Championship – 4th place

XVII Olympic Winter Games – 19th place

World Championship – 6th place

1995

Ukraine Championship – 2nd place

Yevropy- Championship 3rd place

World Championship – 9th place

1996

Ukraine Championship – 1st place

Skate Israel – 2nd place

Championship – 4th place

World Championship – 12th place

1997

Ukraine Championship – 2nd place

Skate Canada Grand Prix – 9th place

Nation’s Cup Grand Prix – 6th place

Skate Israel – 3rd place

Championship – 5th place

1998

Ukraine Championship – 2nd place

Championship – 5th place

XVIII Olympic Winter Games in Nagano – 9th place

World Championship – 7th place

1999

Ukraine Championship -1 place

Championship Yevropy- 7th

Skate Canada Grand Prix – 1st place

World Championship – 8th place

2000

Ukraine Championship – 1st place

Yevropy- Championship 5th place

World Championship – 10th place

2001

Ukraine Championship – 1st place

Yevropy- Championship 4th place

World Championship – 8th place

2002

Ukraine Championship – 2nd place

Championship – 9th place

XIX Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City – 14 th place.

World Championship – 6th place

2003

Ukraine Championship – 1st place

Yevropy- Championship 5th place

World Championship – 7th place

Cup of China Grand Prix – 1st place

Cup of Russia Grand Prix – 1st place

NHK Trophy Grand Prix – 2nd place

2004

Grand Prix Final – 4th place

Yevropy- Championship 2nd place

World Championship – 11th place

2005

Ukraine Championship – 1st place

Yevropy- Championship 3rd place

World Championship – 10th place

2006

Ukraine Championship – 1st place

Biography

Galina Man’yachenko-Efremenko (born December 23, 1980 in Kiev, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet Union) – Ukrainian figure skater, speaking in singles and pair skating. Tryple Ukraine champion in singles, bronze medalist in the World Championships (1994) paired with Eugene Zhilhurskym. Silver medalist of the Winter Universiade in Austria in 2005.

Career

Galina Man’yachenko reached the international level in pair skating. Eugene Zhirhurskim they won bronze medals in the world championship among juniors 1994. However, in 1995, during a performance in training, parallel to the rotation LIBYEL, Galina seriously injured – partner cut her face blade of his skate. Galina returned to the ice after 1.5 years already as alone. On the international stage debut as alone at the Winter Universiade in Slovakia.
It was three times champion of Ukraine, twice participated in the Olympic Games (2002 and 2006) and won such international tournaments as «Nebelhorn Trophy», «Memorial Ondreya Nepela”, “Memorial Karl Schaefer,” was the silver medalist of the Winter Universiade 2005 and winner other competitions. The highest achievement is her fourth place at the European Championships 2002.
In summer 2005, she married Michael Ukrainian p’yatybortsya Efremenko last season and competed in his name. Has finished amateur career in 2006. Moved to Latvia, where a coach in figure skating at “Yurmalski skates.” In 2007, bore a daughter.

Sport achievements

Better results MIS system

(The international amateur competitions)

Total: 145.86

Brief: 53.54

Random: 96.24

Oleksandra Yevhenivna Nazarova (born November 30, 1996, Kharkiv, Ukraine) is a Ukrainian figure skater who performs in ice dancing with Maxim Nikitin. Three-time champion of Ukraine in figure skating in ice dancing (2015, 2017, 2018). Silver medalist of the 2012 Winter Youth Olympic Games in Innsbruck, Austria. Bronze medalist of the Junior World Figure Skating Championships 2015 in Tallinn, Estonia.

Champion of the Winter Universiade 2017 in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

Participant of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, together with Maxim Nikitin.

Maksym Kostiantynovych Nikitin (born October 5, 1994, Kharkiv, Ukraine) is a Ukrainian figure skater who performs ice dancing with Oleksandra Nazarova, the 2017 Winter Universiade champion.

Three-time champion of Ukraine in figure skating in ice dancing (2015, 2017, 2018). Silver medalist of the 2012 Winter Youth Olympic Games in Innsbruck, Austria. Bronze medalist of the Junior World Figure Skating Championships 2015 in Tallinn, Estonia.

Participant of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, together with Alexandra Nazarova.

As of September 18, 2019, the pair ranks 23rd in the ranking of the International Skating Union (IUU).

Biography

Born February 2, 1971 in Odessa (USSR) – Soviet skater, world champion in figure skating Championships 1986 in figure skating. USSR Master of Sports of international class. Younger brother Victor Petrenko. Currently a coach in figure skating in the United States (International Centre Simsburi, Connecticut).

Viktor Vasyliovych Petrenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Васильович Петренко; born 27 June 1969) is a Ukrainian former competitive figure skater who represented the Soviet Union, the Unified Team, and Ukraine during his career. He is the 1992 Olympic Champion for the Unified Team. Petrenko became the first flagbearer for Ukraine. Petrenko currently lives in the United States and works as an ISU Technical Specialist, tours professionally, and coaches figure skating.

Early life

Viktor was born in Odessa, Ukrainian SSR, the first of two sons born to engineers Tamara and Vasyl Petrenko. His younger brother Vladimir Petrenko was also a competitive skater and the 1986 World Junior champion. The Petrenko family spoke Russian which was dominant in Odessa, as well as a means of inter-ethnic communication throughout the USSR. Viktor Petrenko attended a Russian-speaking school where he chose to study English as a foreign language. Because Ukrainian was not used in his family or his school, he never learned to speak the native language of his own country fluently.

Petrenko was often sick as a young child and doctors suggested to his parents that they put him in a sport in order to improve his strength and stamina, so when he was five years old, they took him to the local ice rink and started him in figure skating. At the age of nine, his talent was noticed by Ukrainian figure skating coach Galina Zmievskaya and she took him on as a pupil at Spartak in Odessa.

Competitive career

For the Soviet Union, Petrenko was the 1984 World Junior Champion and won the bronze medal at the 1988 Olympic Games. He then went on to win his first two European Championships in 1990 and 1991. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union in December 1991, athletes from former Soviet states went to the Olympics together for the last time in 1992 on a Unified Team. Petrenko competed for this Unified Team and with a free skate that was ranked above American Paul Wylie’s by seven of the nine judges, he won the gold medal, the first ever for a singles skater from the former Soviet Union. A month later he went to the 1992 World Championships and won the gold medal there, as well, earning two 6.0’s for presentation in his free program and receiving first-place ranking from all nine judges.

Petrenko turned professional following his Olympic win, moving to Las Vegas, Nevada, but when the International Skating Union ruled that professionals could return to competitive status in 1993, he moved back to Odessa, Ukraine and began training for another Olympics. He won his third European Championships in January 1994, competing for the first time for the independent nation of Ukraine, and went on to represent his homeland at the 1994 Lillehammer Olympics, where it was widely expected that he, 1988 Olympic gold medalist Brian Boitano and World Champion Kurt Browning would be the main challengers for medals. After the short program, Petrenko was in ninth place after stepping out of his triple axel and not completing the rotation on his triple lutz, and Boitano and Browning were in eighth and twelfth, respectively. His performance in the free skate pulled him up to a fourth-place finish.

Later life

In 1992, Petrenko convinced his coach Galina Zmievskaya to take in a 14-year-old Ukrainian orphan named Oksana Baiul and become both her guardian and coach, with Petrenko covering Baiul’s expenses. With their guidance, Baiul went on to win the 1993 World Figure Skating Championship and the gold medal at the 1994 Olympic Games.

He performed as the Scarecrow for the CBS television special The Wizard of Oz on Ice in 1996.

Petrenko married Zmievskaya’s oldest daughter, Nina Milken, on 19 June 1992 and their daughter Victoria was born on 21 July 1997. After the 1994 Winter Olympics, Viktor, Nina, Zmievskaya, Baiul and Viktor’s brother Vladimir all left Ukraine and moved to Simsbury, Connecticut, where Petrenko and Baiul were invited to train and Zmievskaya and Vladimir Petrenko joined the coaching staff at the new International Skating Center of Connecticut.

In March 2001, Petrenko organized the Viktory for Kids ice show in Simsbury, Connecticut and invited his celebrity friends from the international figure skating community to perform in order to raise public awareness and funds for the thousands of children still being affected by elevated radiation levels from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster that had occurred in his homeland of Ukrainian SSR fifteen years earlier. $108,000 was raised, and later that year was used to open The Viktor Petrenko Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Odessa, Ukraine with state-of-the-art medical technology. In October 2003, Petrenko organized a second “Viktory for Kids” show, this time in Danbury, Connecticut. In addition to Petrenko, the show included Olympic champions Ekaterina Gordeeva (with her daughter, Daria Grinkova [Petrenko’s goddaughter]), Ilia Kulik, Evgeni Plushenko, Brian Boitano, and Oksana Kazakova / Artur Dimitriev.

In January 2004, Petrenko was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence after crashing his car into a utility pole in Connecticut and refusing to take a breathalyzer test. His record was cleared after he completed an adult alcohol education program.

Petrenko, wife Nina and mother-in-law Zmievskaya left the International Skating Center of Connecticut in 2005 and moved to New Jersey, where they all began coaching together at the Ice Vault Arena in Wayne, New Jersey. They have coached American men’s figure skater Johnny Weir since the summer of 2007 and they coached Swiss skater Stéphane Lambiel for several months until injury forced his retirement from competitive skating in October 2008.

Petrenko toured as a performing skater with the US company of Champions on Ice for a record twenty seasons, until COI went out of business after the 2007 season. He is an ISU Technical Specialist for Ukraine and was the Assistant Technical Specialist for the men’s event at the 2006 Winter Olympics. In June 2008, he was elected to the Presidium of the Ukrainian Figure Skating Federation.

Programs

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
1993-1994 Toreador Song from Carmen
by Georges Bizet
“La donna e mobile” from “Rigoletto,”
by Giuseppe Verdi
“Ah fors e lui” from “La Traviata,”
by Giuseppe Verdi
Baila Mi
by Gipsy Kings
1991-1992 Carmen
by Georges Bizet
Raymond overture
by Thomas
Le Cid ballet music
by Jules Massenet
Waltz op.64 No.2
by Frédéric Chopin
I Vespi Siciliani overture
by Giuseppe Verdi
Let’s Twist Again
by Chubby Checker
1987-1988 Flames of Paris
by Boris Asafyev
Don Quixote
by Ludwig Minkus
Ave Maria
by Schubert

Results

International
Event 1983–84 1984–85 1985–86 1986–87 1987–88 1988–89 1989–90 1990–91 1991–92 1992–93 1993–94
Olympics 3rd 1st 4th
Worlds 9th 5th 6th 3rd 6th 2nd 2nd 1st
Europeans 6th 4th 3rd 3rd 1st 1st 2nd 1st
Goodwill Games 2nd
Skate America 3rd 2nd 2nd 1st 1st
Skate Canada 3rd 2nd
Nations Cup 2nd 1st
NHK Trophy 3rd 1st 1st
Moscow News 3rd
St. Ivel 2nd
International: Junior
Junior Worlds 1st
National
Ukrainian Champ. 1st
Soviet Champ. 3rd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 1st 3rd

Anna Nikolayevna Zadorozhniuk (Ukrainian: Ганна Миколаївна Задорожнюк, born October 25, 1984) is a Ukrainian ice dancer. With partner Sergei Verbillo, she is the 2009 & 2010 Ukrainian national champion. Zadorozhniuk previously skated with Alexander Veselovski and Alexander Kudriavtsev. She married fellow figure skater, Roman Serov in 2011.

Programs

(with Verbillo)

Season Original dance Free dance
2009–2010 Ukrainian folk dance:

  • V Nochok
  • Hopak
  • Vivre Pour Le Meilleur
    by Johnny Halliday
2008–2009 Chicago soundtrack:

  • Charleston: All that Jazz
  • Foxtrot: Razzle Dazzle
  • Charleston: All that Jazz
  • Carmen
    by Georges Bizet
2007–2008 Ukrainian folk dance:

  • Hopak
  • Nostradamus
    by Maksim Mrvica
2006–2007
  • A Los Amigos
    by A. Pointer
  • Tus Ojos de Cielo
    by L. Adrover
  • Stella Errans
    from Dralion (Cirque du Soleil)
    by Violaine Corradi
2005–2006
  • Samba: Black Machine
  • Rhumba: You Are My Home
  • Samab: Tres Oases
  • The Mask of Zorro
    by James Horner
2004–2005
  • Slow foxtrot
  • Quickstep
  • Turn Around
    by Bonnie Tyler, Kareen Antonn
2003–2004
  • Blues: Bensonhurst Blues
    by Oscar Benton
  • Jive: Big Beat
    by Oscar Benton
  • Blues: Bensonhurst Blues
    by Oscar Benton
  • Storm
    (from Four Seasons)
    by Antonio Vivaldi
    performed by Vanessa-Mae
2002–2003
  • Waltz
    by Johann Strauss
    London Symphony Orchestra
  • Polka: Tritsch Tratsch Polka
    by Johann Strauss
    London Symphony Orchestra
  • Boogie and Blues
    by Brian Setzer and Orchestra

Competitive highlights

(with Verbillo)

Results[9]
International
Event 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10
Olympics 16th
Worlds 21st 17th 18th 15th WD
Europeans 10th 11th 7th 8th
GP Bompard 10th 10th
GP Cup of China 6th 5th 4th
GP Cup of Russia 3rd 8th
GP NHK Trophy 10th 6th 6th
Ondrej Nepela 1st
Universiade 6th
International: Junior
Junior Worlds 8th 15th 7th
JGP Final 8th 5th
JGP Czech 1st
JGP Germany 8th
JGP Italy 6th
JGP Japan 5th
JGP Slovakia 2nd 2nd
JGP Sweden 2nd
JGP Ukraine 7th
EYOF 5th J.
National
Ukrainian 7th J. 1st J. 2nd J. 1st J. 4th 3rd 2nd 2nd 1st 1st
GP = Grand Prix; JGP = Junior Grand Prix; J. = Junior level; WD = Withdrew

Vyacheslav Zagorodniuk (August 11, 1972 in Odessa, Ukrainian SSR, USSR) – Soviet and Ukrainian skater, speaking in singles. European Champion 1996, World Championship bronze medalist in 1994, world champion Junior 1989 Vice World Champion Junior 1988. Finished amateur career in 1998. At the present time – coach of figure skating.

Career

Figure skating started at age 5 in Odessa. Trained in coaching tandem Galina Zmiyevska – Valentin Nikolayev. After winning Oksana Baiul at the Olympic Games 1994, Zmeevskaya went to the US and stayed with Zagorodniuk Nikolaev to 1998. Under the direction of Nikolaev Zagorodniuk became European champion in 1996 .Zmiyivska instilled Zagorodniuk (and most famous his disciple Vladimir Petrenko) strict elegant classical style with elements filigree technique, the key was a difficult triple axel jump. Finished career with coach Vyacheslav also moved to America.

After sports

Vyacheslav Zagorodniuk (right) as a coach Vitaly Danilchenko at the European Championships 2004.

After the amateur career coach lived and worked in the city of Richmond, Virginia, USA, before moving to California .Napryklad, coached five times champion of Ukraine Vitaly Danilchenko of individuals and Alice Kireev .In fact, performed in various shows and participated in programs on American television.

In 2006 he organized and sprodyusuvav Ice show “Magic Ice” in Kiev. The show was attended by skaters such as Oksana Baiul, Ilia Kulik, Elena Berezhnaya and Anton Sikharulidze, Surya Bonali and others.

In 2007, in Kiev opened its own indoor ice rink and created a club to practice figure skating – “Capital”, which is now not functioning

In 2011, at the invitation of the Federation of figure skating Ukraine returned home and began work in Kyiv coach youth sports school “Leader”.

Privacy

Married to former Ukrainian figure skater, speaking in ice dancing with Vitaliy Baranov – Olga Mudrak. Maxim has a son and daughter Alina.

Dmytro M. Dimitrenko (July 25, 1973 in Kiev, Ukrainian SSR) – Ukrainian skater, speaking in figure skating. European Champion 1993, twice champion of Ukraine, World Champion Junior 1992 (on the banner of the USSR).

Career

In 1993 Dmitry Dimitrenko won their European Championship debut. Interestingly, shortly before the competition Dmitry broken blade right skate. Change model skate before the race can not – do not have time to break in. In Vyacheslav Zagorodniuk found left skate of the same brand, and attached it to boot. So this European championship was won two left edges.

Dimitrenko year earlier, back in the USSR team, won the world championship among juniors.

The next big medal competition had seven years to achieve. She was the bronze European Championships 2000. At the world championships Dmytrenko did not rise above 11 seats in 2000. Dmitry participated in two Olympics, in 1998, took 14th place, and in 2002 – 18 th. After the World Cup 2002, he completed kar’yeru.Pislya end amateur athletic career coached skaters, for example, repeated winner of Ukrainian championships Alexei Bychenko .YE judge on the internal Ukrainian competitions and technicians MIS.

Since 2006 – director of the “Ukrainian theater on ice”.

Yevhen Plyuta (Ukrainian: Євген Плюта or Evgeni Pliuta from Russian: Евгений Плюта, born 30 June 1974) is a Ukrainian former competitive figure skater. He is the 1993 World Junior champion. His best results at senior ISU Championships were ninth at the 1998 World Championships and seventh at the 1999 European Championships.

Programs

Season Short program Free skating
1998–99
[2]
  • Nouveau Flamenco
1997–98
1996–97
1995–96
  • Hamlet
    by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Results

International[2]
Event 90–91
(URS)
91–92
(URS)
92–93
(UKR)
93–94
(UKR)
94–95
(UKR)
95–96
(UKR)
96–97
(UKR)
97–98
(UKR)
98–99
(UKR)
99–00
(UKR)
World Champ. 9th 15th
European Champ. 12th 12th 7th
GP Cup of Russia 6th
GP NHK Trophy 5th 9th
GP Skate America 6th
GP Skate Canada 6th
GP Trophée de France 7th
Nebelhorn Trophy 2nd 2nd
Nepela Memorial 3rd
Prague Skate 1st
Skate Israel 3rd
International: Junior[1][2]
World Junior Champ. 6th 4th 1st
Blue Swords 1st
National[2]
Ukrainian Champ. 5th 4th 3rd 2nd 3rd 2nd
WD: Withdrew

Ruslan Nikolaevich Goncharov (Russian: Руслан Николаевич Гончаров or Ukrainian: Руслан Миколайович Гончаров Ruslan Mykolayovych Honcharov; born 20 January 1973) is a Ukrainian ice dancer. With partner Elena Grushina, he is the 2006 Olympic bronze medalist, 2005 World bronze medalist, and two-time (2005, 2006) European silver medalist.

Career

Goncharov began skating at the age of six. He was originally a single skater but grew too tall and switched to ice dancing when he was 13. He first competed with Elenora Gritsai but the partnership ended due to health problems. Goncharov is currently a coach teaching ice dance at the Ashburn Ice House in Ashburn, Virginia and at the Gardens Ice House in Laurel, Md.

Having trained in the same group in Odessa, Goncharov and Elena Grushina were paired together in 1989. They finished fourth at the 1992 Junior Worlds. They were 18th in their senior Worlds debut at the 1994 World Championships. In early 1997, Grushina and Goncharov began training with coaches Natalia Linichuk and Gennadi Karponosov in Newark, Delaware. They finished 15th at their first Olympics in 1998. They won their first Grand Prix medal, silver, at 1999 Skate Canada International.

Grushina and Goncharov were 9th at the 2002 Olympics and 6th at the 2002 World Championships. In the summer of 2002, they changed coaches to Tatiana Tarasova and Nikolai Morozov in Newington, Connecticut. During the 2002–03 season, they won three gold medals on the Grand Prix series, at 2002 Skate America, 2002 Skate Canada International, and 2002 Trophée Lalique. They qualified for the Grand Prix Final where they finished fourth. They were also fourth at the 2003 European Championships and fifth at the 2003 World Championships.

During the 2003–04 season, Grushina and Goncharov won three silver medals on the Grand Prix series, at 2003 Skate America, 2003 Cup of China, and 2003 NHK Trophy. They qualified for the Grand Prix Final where they again finished fourth, but a couple months later they won their first European medal, bronze, at the 2004 European Championships. They were fourth at the 2004 World Championships.

During the 2004–05 season, Grushina and Goncharov competed at one Grand Prix event, 2004 Cup of Russia, where they won the silver medal. Since they only competed at one event, they did not earn enough points to qualify for the Grand Prix Final. They won their second European medal, silver, at the 2005 European Championships. They capped off their season by winning their first World medal, bronze, at the 2005 World Championships.

During the 2005–06 season, Grushina and Goncharov competed at two Grand Prix events. They won silver at 2005 Skate Canada International and gold at 2005 Trophée Eric Bompard. They qualified for their third Grand Prix Final and came away with their first medal at the event, silver. They won their third European medal, silver, at the 2006 European Championships. At the 2006 Olympics, they were fifth in the compulsory dance but placed third in the original and free dances to capture their first Olympic medal. They retired after the Olympics.

Personal life

Goncharov and Grushina were married in 1995 and divorced in 2008. Goncharov’s brother, Artur, 15 years younger, also competed in ice dancing.

Programs

(with Grushina)

Season Original dance Free dance Exhibition
2005–2006
  • Samba, rhumba: Carneval of Batreada
    by Peter Prade
  • The Feeling Begins
    (from Passion)
    by Peter Gabriel
  • Adagio
    by Lara Fabian
2004–2005
  • Foxtrot, Charleston: Maybe Next Time
    by Liza Minnelli
  • Quickstep: Life is a Cabaret
  • Four Seasons
    by Antonio Vivaldi
2003–2004
  • Swing: Sing, Sing, Sing
  • Blues: Summer
    produced by Robert Kraft
  • Hanging / Escape
    by Craig Armstrong
2002–2003
  • The Blue Danube
    by Johann Strauss II
    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
  • Polka
    by Johann Strauss
  • Quixote
    by Magnus Fiennes
    performed by Bond
2001–2002
  • Libertango
    by Ástor Piazzolla
  • España cañí
    by Pascual Marquina
  • Barcelona
    by Montserrat Caballé, Freddie Mercury
2000–2001
  • Foxtrot: I’m a Broadway Baby
    (from Fosse)
  • Quickstep: Sing, Sing, Sing
    by Louis Prima
  • Gladiator
    by Hans Zimmer, Lisa Gerrard
1999–2000
  • Maria
    by Ricky Martin
  • Eres Todo En Mi
    by Ana Gabriel
  • Spente Le Stelle
    by Emma Shapplin
1998–1999
  • Masquerade Waltz
    by Aram Khachaturian
  • Songs from the Victorious City
    by Anne Dudley, Jaz Coleman
1997–1998
  • Rock Around the Clock
    by Bill Haley & His Comets
  • Unknown Ukrainian folk dances
1995–1996
  • El Torro Rojo
    performed by C. Willems, Manuelo Montez Orchestra
  • Jiger
    performed by Glenn Miller, Max Gregor Orchestra

Results

(with Grushina for Ukraine)

 

Results
International
Event 1992–93 1993–94 1994–95 1995–96 1996–97 1997–98 1998–99 1999–00 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06
Olympics 15th 9th 3rd
Worlds 18th 22nd 19th 13th 8th 7th 8th 6th 5th 4th 3rd
Europeans 14th 13th 13th 7th 8th 7th 8th 4th 3rd 2nd 2nd
Grand Prix Final 4th 4th 2nd
GP Cup of China 2nd
GP Cup of Russia 9th 3rd 2nd
GP Lalique/Bompard 1st 1st
GP Nations/Sparkassen 10th 4th
GP NHK Trophy 4th 4th 5th 2nd
GP Skate America 8th 1st 2nd
GP Skate Canada 4th 2nd 4th 1st 2nd
Goodwill Games 4th 3rd
Karl Schäfer 3rd
Nebelhorn Trophy 2nd
Skate Israel 2nd
Universiade 1st
Centennial On Ice 9th
Polish FSA Trophy 1st
National
Ukrainian Champ. 2nd 3rd 2nd 3rd 2nd 2nd 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st
GP = Became part of Champions Series in 1995–1996, renamed Grand Prix in 1998–1999.

(with Grushina for the Soviet Union)

Event 1991–1992
World Junior Championships 4th

Biography

Helen Grushina (January 8, 1975, Odessa) – Ukrainian figure skater, Olympic medalist.

Elena Grushin trained in the sports community of the Armed Forces of Ukraine in Odessa.

Olympic medal she won at the Turin Olympics in sport dancing in a pair with Ruslan Goncharov.

Sport medals

Representative – Ukraine

Figure skating

Olympic Games

Bronza- Turin 2006- Sports Dance.

Dmitri Shkidchenko (Ukrainian: Дмитро Шкидченко, Russian: Дмитрий Шкидченко) is a former pair skater who competed internationally for the Soviet Union. With partner Irina Mironenko, he is the 1985 and 1986 World Junior silver medalist.

Following his retirement from competition, he became a coach. His current and former students include:

  • Alina Dikhtiar / Filip Zalevski
  • Julia Beloglazova / Andrei Bekh
  • Julia Obertas / Dmitri Palamarchuk
  • Tatiana Chuvaeva / Dmitri Palamarchuk
  • Julia Obertas / Alexei Sokolov
  • Julia Lavrentieva / Yuri Rudyk

 

 

Results

(with Mironenko)

Event 1984–85 1985–86 1986–87
World Junior Championships 2nd 2nd
Blue Swords 1st
St. Ivel International 5th

References

  • World Junior Figure Skating Championships: Pairs” (PDF). International Skating Union. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 November 2013.
  • Alina Dikhtiar / Filip Zalevski at the International Skating Union
  • Julia Beloglazova / Andrei Bekh at the International Skating Union
  • Tatiana Chuvaeva / Dmitri Palamarchuk at the International Skating Union
  • Julia Obertas / Alexei Sokolov at the International Skating Union
  • Дмитро Шкидченко: «Потрібно працювати далі» [Dmytro Shkidchenko: More work needed] (in Ukrainian). National Olympic Committee of Ukraine. 13 February 2014.

Sergei Oleksandrovych Verbillo (Ukrainian: Сергій Олександрович Вербілло, born July 21, 1984) is a Ukrainian former competitive ice dancer. With partner Anna Zadorozhniuk, he is the 2009 & 2010 Ukrainian national champion. Verbillo previously skated with Alla Beknazarova.
Programs

(with Zadorozhniuk)

Season Original dance Free dance
2009–2010 Ukrainian folk dance:

  • V Nochok
  • Hopak
  • Vivre Pour Le Meilleur
    by Johnny Halliday
2008–2009 Chicago soundtrack:

  • Charleston: All that Jazz
  • Foxtrot: Razzle Dazzle
  • Charleston: All that Jazz
  • Carmen
    by Georges Bizet
2007–2008 Ukrainian folk dance:

  • Hopak
  • Nostradamus
    by Maksim Mrvica
2006–2007
  • A Los Amigos
    by A. Pointer
  • Tus Ojos de Cielo
    by L. Adrover
  • Stella Errans
    from Dralion (Cirque du Soleil)
    by Violaine Corradi
2005–2006
  • Samba: Black Machine
  • Rhumba: You Are My Home
  • Samab: Tres Oases
  • The Mask of Zorro
    by James Horner
2004–2005
  • Slow foxtrot
  • Quickstep
  • Turn Around
    by Bonnie Tyler, Kareen Antonn
2003–2004
  • Blues: Bensonhurst Blues
    by Oscar Benton
  • Jive: Big Beat
    by Oscar Benton
  • Blues: Bensonhurst Blues
    by Oscar Benton
  • Storm
    (from Four Seasons)
    by Antonio Vivaldi
    performed by Vanessa-Mae
2002–2003
  • Waltz
    by Johann Strauss
    London Symphony Orchestra
  • Polka: Tritsch Tratsch Polka
    by Johann Strauss
    London Symphony Orchestra
  • Boogie and Blues
    by Brian Setzer and Orchestra

Competitive highlights

(with Zadorozhniuk)

Results[9]
International
Event 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10
Olympics 16th
Worlds 21st 17th 18th 15th WD
Europeans 10th 11th 7th 8th
GP Bompard 10th 10th
GP Cup of China 6th 5th 4th
GP Cup of Russia 3rd 8th
GP NHK Trophy 10th 6th 6th
Ondrej Nepela 1st
Universiade 6th
International: Junior
Junior Worlds 8th 15th 7th
JGP Final 8th 5th
JGP Czech 1st
JGP Germany 8th
JGP Italy 6th
JGP Japan 5th
JGP Slovakia 2nd 2nd
JGP Sweden 2nd
JGP Ukraine 7th
EYOF 5th J.
National
Ukrainian 7th J. 1st J. 2nd J. 1st J. 4th 3rd 2nd 2nd 1st 1st
GP = Grand Prix; JGP = Junior Grand Prix; J. = Junior level; WD = Withdrew